Al Nusrah Front claims yet another suicide attack in Syria


The al Qaeda-linked Al Nusrah Front for the People of the Levant has claimed credit for yet another suicide attack in Syria. The suicide attack is the 50th in Syria in the past 12 months; 41 of them have been claimed by the Al Nusrah Front.

The Al Nusrah Front claimed it killed "about 50 Nusayri [Alawite] soldiers" in a complex attack on "the Khan al-Baqar barrier, which is located near the Nayrab airport" in Aleppo in eastern Syria on Dec. 2, according to a statement by the group that was obtained and translated by the SITE Intelligence Group. Additionally, the terror group said the attack destroyed "a T82 tank, a BMB [likely an armored BMP], and a DShk- mounted pickup truck."

The terror group claimed that a group of fighters attacked the outpost in order to provide a diversion for the suicide bomber, who was identified as "Abu Bakr al Halabi." Then, the suicide bomber rammed a truck "laden with 700 kg of explosives." The Al Nusrah Front provided photographs of the truck as well as the resultant blast.

The Al Nusrah Front has stepped up its suicide operations in Syria over the past three months. Since the end of August, the terror group has claimed credit for launching 23 suicide attacks.

Al Nusrah Front conducts joint operations with Free Syrian Army, other jihadist groups

The Syrian terror group is known to conduct joint operations with other Syrian jihadist organizations. In mid-November, Al Nusrah reported that it attacked a base in Idlib along with the Ahrar al Sham Brigades, and even shot down a Syrian MiG fighter aircraft.

The Al Nusrah Front is also known to conduct joint operations with the Free Syrian Army, which is often upheld as the secular resistance to Assad's regime. On Oct. 11, Al Nusrah, the Free Syrian Army, and Chechen fighters overran a Syrian air defense and Scud missile base in Aleppo [see LWJ report, Al Nusrah Front commanded Free Syrian Army unit, 'Chechen emigrants,' in assault on Syrian air defense base]. In August, Al Nusrah said it attacked a police station outside of Damascus along with the Al Sahaba Battalion, a unit of the Free Syrian Army that operates in the capital [see Threat Matrix report, Al Nusrah Front conducts joint operation with Free Syrian Army].

Al Nusrah has become more appealing to Syrian rebels as the group's fighters are better organized and have expertise from waging jihad in Iraq and elsewhere, and have integrated their operations with the Free Syrian Army.

Foreign jihadists have begun to pour into Syria to wage jihad against Assad's regime. Fighters from Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, Jordan, and the Palestinian Territories are known to have been killed in Syria. Recently, two of Abu Musab al Zarqawi's cousins were detained by Jordanian security forces after fighting in Syria.

Jihadists from the UK may be flocking to the Syrian battlefields as well. In mid-October, The Times reported that authorities had identified a Bangladeshi resident of London as the leader of a group of British jihadists seeking to fight in Syria. Scotland Yard seized computers and mobile phones from members of the group, which consists mainly of Londoners and includes seasoned Chechen fighters.

Several other Islamist groups also operate in Syria, including Al Qaeda in Iraq, the Abdullah Azzam Brigades, the Al Baraa Ibn Malik Martyrdom Brigade, and the Omar al Farouq Brigade.

Reported or suspected suicide bombings in Syria:

The dates given below are, in most cases, the dates of the attacks. In a few cases, when the date of a claimed attack is unknown, the date of Al Nusrah's claim of responsibility is used. So far, no other group has claimed responsibility for suicide attacks in Syria since December 2011.

Dec. 23, 2011 - Two car bombings in Damascus on this day are the first known suicide attacks in Syria since the rebellion began nine months earlier. The attacks targeted the regime's intelligence offices, killing at least 44 people and wounding more than 160 others. According to the National Counterterrorism Center, it is likely that two female suicide bombers deployed by Al Qaeda in Iraq were responsible.

Jan. 6, 2012 - A suicide car bomb attack killed 26 people in Damascus. The Al Nusrah Front later claimed responsibility for the attack.

Feb. 10, 2012 - Twin suicide car bombings killed 28 people in Aleppo. The Al Nusrah Front later claimed responsibility for the attack.

Mar. 17, 2012 - Two suicide car bombings killed at least 27 people and wounded 100 or more in Damascus. The bombings targeted the Assad regime's security forces. The Al Nusrah Front later claimed responsibility for the bombings and released a video, translated by SITE, showing the two bombers giving speeches before their attacks.

April 20, 2012 - A suicide bomber attacked Syrian military forces dining at a restaurant in Hama. The Al Nusrah Front later claimed responsibility for the attack, saying the Syrian forces targeted had massacred civilians in a nearby town.

April 24, 2012 - A suicide bomber attacked the Iranian Cultural Consulate in Damascus. The Al Nusrah Front later claimed responsibility for the attack.

April 27, 2012 - A suicide bomber attacked at a mosque in the Midan neighborhood of Damascus. The attack reportedly killed 11 people and wounded 28 more. The Al Nusrah Front later claimed responsibility, saying the attack targeted regime personnel who were attending prayers.

April 30, 2012 - In an apparent attack on Syrian military intelligence services, two bombs are detonated in the town of Idlib. According to Reuters, state-controlled media said that nine people were killed, with 100 more wounded, and two suicide bombers were responsible. An "activist" said that 20 people were killed. The Associated Press also attributed the attack to suicide bombers.

May 10, 2012 - Two suicide car bomb attacks killed at least 55 people and wounded more than 370 others in Damascus. According to the BBC, the "blasts happened near a military intelligence building during morning rush hour." Days later, it appeared that Al Nusrah claimed credit for the attacks in a video online. Subsequently, however, Al Nusrah denied the validity of the video, saying it had not been published by the group's official media arm.

May 19, 2012 - A suicide bomber attacked the Syrian intelligence services in Deir al-Zor. According to Reuters, the state news agency said that nine people were killed and approximately 100 others were wounded. The Al Nusrah Front later claimed responsibility for the bombing.

June 1, 2012 - A suicide bomber attacked a Syrian military camp in Idlib. The suicide bomber's attack was just one component of the complex assault, which also involved an ambush and IED attacks. The Al Nusrah Front later claimed responsibility for the raid.

June 7, 2012 - A suicide bomber attacked a bus carrying state security personnel in Aleppo. The Al Nusrah Front claimed responsibility for the operation.

June 14, 2012 - A suicide bomber attacked state security services outside of Damascus. The Al Nusrah Front claimed responsibility for the attack and said that "many" security personnel were killed.

June 26, 2012 - The Al Nusrah Front claims that it conducted two suicide bombings against Syrian military forces on this day. The terrorist organization also claimed that 250 Syrian soldiers were killed in the attacks, according to translations prepared by SITE. The Long War Journal did not find independent verification for the high number of casualties claimed by the Al Nusrah Front.

June 30, 2012 - In a statement dated this day, the Al Nusrah Front claimed that a suicide bomber attacked a security barrier in Daraa, a town in southern Syria. The group did not say when the attack took place. On Mar. 3, a car bomb was detonated near a military checkpoint in Daraa. The Syrian government claimed it was a suicide attack that killed two people; opposition forces denied that it was a suicide attack. According to a local resident interviewed by Reuters, at least seven people were killed and eight more were wounded. It is unclear if the Mar. 3 attack is the same one claimed by Al Nusrah.

July 18, 2012 - A bomb killed senior Syrian military and intelligence officials. There are conflicting reports as to whether a suicide bombing or a remote-controlled explosive device was used in the attack. Among those killed was Assef Shawkat, the deputy defense minister and former head of Syrian military intelligence. Shawkat, who was the brother-in-law of Bashar al Assad, had supported AQI for years.

July 19, 2012 - In a statement released online days later, the Al Nusrah Front claimed it launched a suicide operation targeting a security barrier in Ma'arat al-Nu'man that killed 60 Syrian soldiers on this day.

Aug. 7, 2012 - In a statement released on this day, the Al Nusrah Front said that a suicide bomber targeted "a military security detachment ... in the area of Mhardeh in the Hama countryside." It is not clear what day the actual attack took place.

Aug. 17, 2012 - The Al Nusrah Front claims that a suicide bomber attacked a gathering of 600 regime "thugs" in Hama on this day. The total number of casualties was not reported.

Aug. 28, 2012 - Al Nusrah claimed it executed a suicide attack "against a large gathering inside the new Equestrian Club" in Hama. The total number of casualties was not reported.

Sept. 2, 2012 - In a statement released on this day, Al Nusrah claimed that a suicide bomber attacked the "Ibn Wardan barrier in Hama governorate." The total number of casualties was not reported.

Sept. 4, 2012 - A suicide bomber known as Abu Khattab al Shami detonated his explosives-packed car at the airport at Abu Kamal. Fighters then launched a follow-on attack. The total number of casualties was not reported.

Sept. 8, 2012 - A suicide bomber identified as Abu Abdullah al Shami attacked a hospital in Aleppo, killing 27 soldiers and wounding 64 more.

Sept. 11, 2012 - Al Nusrah released a statement claiming that Abu al Farooq al Shamali bombed "the fortress of the enemies" in al Bareed al Thani in Deir al Zour. The number of those killed and wounded in the attack was not disclosed.

Sept. 11, 2012 - Al Nusrah claimed that a suicide bomber struck "a barracks of the enemy" in Idlib.

Sept. 26, 2012 - Al Nusrah claimed it launched a complex suicide assault on the Army Headquarters in Damascus. Four soldiers were killed, and 14 more were wounded.

Sept. 30, 2012 - Al Nusrah claimed credit for a suicide attack that targeted the headquarters of Political and Criminal Security in Qamishli in Hasaka province. The group claimed it killed 30 people and wounded 80 others.

Oct. 3, 2012 - An Al Nusrah suicide bomber detonated a car bomb outside the Officer's club in Aleppo. Minutes later, a second suicide bomber detonated at the tourist hotel next to the Officer's club, and then a suicide assault team stormed the hotel.

Oct. 3, 2012 - Al Nusrah launched a suicide attack on the Political Security headquarters in Deir al-Zour, and claimed 50 people were killed and 60 more were wounded.

Oct. 9, 2012 - Al Nusrah launched a complex suicide attack on the Air Force intelligence branch in Harasta outside of Damascus. More than 100 casualties were reported.

Oct. 9, 2012 - Al Nusrah claimed credit for a complex attack on an outpost in Ain Tarma near Damascus that killed 75 Syrian soldiers.

Oct. 12, 2012 - Al Nusrah launched a suicide attack on the Political Security headquarters in Deir al-Zour.

Oct. 12, 2012 - A pair of suicide bombers attacked the al Sahwah Air Defense Brigade in Daraa.

Nov. 5, 2012 - Al Nusrah claimed the suicide attack in Hama that killed more than 50 Syrian soldiers.

Nov. 9, 2012 - A suicide bomber killed several military personnel at a checkpoint near the city of Soran in Hama.

Nov. 10, 2012 - A pair of suicide bombers attacked a military camp in Daraa that is used by military and intelligence forces. The attack killed 20 soldiers.

Nov. 19, 2012 - Al Nusrah claimed to have killed 60 Syrian soldiers and destroyed two tanks in an attack on a military unit in Barad.

Nov. 21, 2012 - Al Nusrah claimed to attack a French hospital in Aleppo. The hospital was being used as a military headquarters, the group claimed.

Nov. 25, 2012 - An Al Nusrah suicide bomber blew up his "explosives-laden vehicle" at the officers' club in Daraa. The date of the attack was not given.

Nov. 25, 2012 - An Al Nusrah suicide bomber targeted a gas station in Daraa that "became a gathering place for a large number of soldiers." The date of the attack was not given.

Nov. 26, 2012 - An Al Nusrah suicide bomber targeted a group of soldiers in West Ghouta outside of Damascus.

Nov. 28, 2012 - A pair of suicide bombers killed 34 people in an attack in a commercial area of the Damascus suburb of Jaramana.

Dec. 2, 2012 - An Al Nusrah suicide bomber supposedly killed 50 Syrian soldiers in an attack on an outpost near an airport in Aleppo.



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READER COMMENTS: "Al Nusrah Front claims yet another suicide attack in Syria"

Posted by mike merlo at December 4, 2012 1:29 PM ET:

great news. Am still awaiting Al Nusrah spreading 'operations' into other neighboring nations. Some evidence indicates that Al Nusrah at the very least is using Iraq for a broad range of activities short of military, terrorist or suicide operations/missions.

Posted by Joel Parker at December 5, 2012 5:54 AM ET:

I think the key development here is that the al-Nusra Front is said here to be "known to conduct joint operations" with both jihadist groups and the Free Syrian Army. Depending on how long the fighting continues, and whether or not NATO gets involved, I suppose we could see either a further integration of the Front with the FSA, or alternatively, as some have suggested elsewhere, an open rift formed between the FSA and the Front based on religious differences.

However, even within the Front there are disagreements, as noted by Ruth Sherlock's recent interview, over how to deal with Syrian minorities. Many of the foreign fighters are seen as less tolerant than the local ones. Yet, in the aftermath, it is assumed that the foreign jihadis will go home, or move on to new targets leaving the local remnants of Nusra Front with a dilemma--how to backtrack to the center if they want to be part of post-Asad leadership.

All of this hinges on how long the fighting goes, and whether the tone become even more shrill than it currently is--say if Asad uses chemical weapons or other unconventional means to attack the opposition.

We can definitely see from SANA and other pro-government sources that the Nusra Front is a favorite target because of its stark contrast with what most Syrians stand for, and for that matter, because it could be used to divide Western opposition to the Asad government. That leaves me with the uneasy feeling that both the Syrian government and the Nusra Front may have the mutual goal of exaggerating the position of the Nusra Front, which could lead to a dramatic rise in its recruiting capabilities.

Posted by Carl at December 5, 2012 12:46 PM ET:

My girlfriend is from Syria and her family still live there. The FSA is not the secular organization that they would have you believe. They have recently made it illegal for women to drive in areas under their control. They are an sunni islamic band of terrorists that want sharia law in Syria. They purposely kill civilians then make it seem like the government has done it.

Posted by larry at December 5, 2012 2:59 PM ET:

How accurate can we consider their casualty claims to be? From what I understand the Al Nasrah Front is not known to exaggerate figures the way the Haqqani Network does, though some of these figures seem a bit high.